Photoelectric effect

Do you know what the photoelectric effect is and how it can be used to produce electricity?

The online photoelectric effect simulations on this page will help you to better understand how this effect is produced and to discover its possible applications.

The photoelectric effect is a fundamental phenomenon that describes the release of electrons from a material when exposed to electromagnetic radiation, such as light. It was discovered by Albert Einstein in 1905 and its understanding laid the foundation for quantum theory.

When light strikes a material, it can interact with electrons on the surface of the material. If the energy of the light photons is high enough, they can transfer their energy to the electrons and release them from the material. This minimum energy required to release the electrons is known as the work function of the material.

The photoelectric effect has several important features. First, the number of electrons released depends on the intensity of the incident light, i.e., the number of photons reaching the material in a given time. In addition, the kinetic energy of the released electrons depends on the energy of the incident photons, which is related to their wavelength. This explains why different colors of light can have different effects on the material.

In addition, the photoelectric effect has implications for quantum theory. Einstein proposed that light is composed of discrete particles called photons, which carry a specific amount of energy. This revolutionary concept helped explain why light can behave as both a wave and a particle.

The photoelectric effect has practical applications in a number of areas. For example, it is fundamental in solar power generation, where solar panels use the photoelectric effect to convert sunlight into electricity. It is also used in imaging devices, such as digital cameras and scanners, where photodetectors capture light and convert it into electrical signals to form an image.

Photoelectric Effect Laboratory


Photoelectric effect I


The photoelectric effect is the phenomenon whereby electrons jump when a beam of light strikes a metallic surface, causing the energy of the light to be transformed into electrical energy. This simulation allows us to study the photoelectric effect. Observe the results by changing the type of light, intensity, etc.
Click here to start the simulation

Photoelectric effect II


See how light strikes the electrons of a metallic object, and recreate the experiment that gave rise to the field of quantum mechanics.

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Photoelectric effect experiment


The photoelectric effect is the phenomenon whereby electrons jump when a beam of light strikes a metal surface, causing the energy of the light to be transformed into electrical energy. This simulation allows us to study the photoelectric effect. Observe the results as the intensity, voltage, etc.
Click here to start the simulation

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