Alkane Hydrocarbons

What do you know about hydrocarbons and in particular about alkane hydrocarbons?

The online alkane hydrocarbon simulations on this page visualize through 3D images of the molecules of some of the most important alkane hydrocarbons: methane, ethane, propane and butane.

Alkane hydrocarbons are a class of fundamental organic compounds consisting of carbon and hydrogen atoms only. They are known as saturated hydrocarbons because all the bonds between the carbon atoms are single, meaning that they are saturated with hydrogen atoms.

Alkanes can be found in different states of matter, from gases such as methane to liquids such as pentane and hexane, and even solids such as heptane. Their chemical structure is based on a linear or branched carbon chain, where hydrogen atoms are linked to carbon atoms by single bonds.

These compounds are named according to the number of carbon atoms present in their molecule. For example, methane has only one carbon atom, ethane has two carbon atoms, propane has three carbon atoms and so on. The general formula for alkanes is CnH2n+2, where “n” represents the number of carbon atoms.

Alkanes are widely used as fuels. Natural gas, which contains mainly methane, is an important energy source used for heating, electricity generation and as a fuel in vehicles. Gasoline, which is a mixture of hydrocarbons, also contains alkanes, such as heptane and octane, which provide energy for internal combustion engines.

In addition to their use as fuels, alkanes have applications in the petrochemical industry. They are used as feedstock for the production of plastics, such as polyethylene and polypropylene, as well as for the manufacture of chemicals, lubricants, solvents and detergents.

In summary, these online alkane hydrocarbon simulations and 3D images give you a visualization of the molecules that will undoubtedly help you to better understand these important chemical compounds. Don’t miss them!

Methane


Methane is the simplest alkane hydrocarbon, whose chemical formula is CH4. Each of the hydrogen atoms is bonded to carbon by a covalent bond. It is a non-polar substance that occurs as a gas at ordinary temperatures and pressures. It is colorless, odorless and insoluble in water.
Methane
CH4
Metano
SingleBondSingle bond
DoubleBond Double bond
TripleBondTriple bond
WedgeBond Wedge bond
HashBond Hash bond

Ethane


Ethane is an aliphatic alkane hydrocarbon with two carbon atoms, formula C2H6. Under normal conditions it is gaseous and an excellent fuel. Its boiling point is -88 °C. It is found in appreciable quantities in natural gas.
Ethane
C2H6
Metano
SingleBondSingle bond
DoubleBond Double bond
TripleBondTriple bond
WedgeBond Wedge bond
HashBond Hash bond

Propane


Propane is a colorless, odorless gas. It belongs to the aliphatic hydrocarbons with carbon single bonds, known as alkanes. Its chemical formula is C3H8.
Propane
C3H8
Metano
SingleBondSingle bond
DoubleBond Double bond
TripleBondTriple bond
WedgeBond Wedge bond
HashBond Hash bond

Butane


Butane, also called n-butane, is a saturated, paraffinic or aliphatic, flammable, gaseous hydrocarbon that liquefies at atmospheric pressure at -0.5 °C, consisting of four carbon atoms and ten hydrogen atoms, whose chemical formula is C4H10. An isomer of this gas can also be called by the same name: isobutane or methylpropane.
Butane
C4H10
Metano
SingleBondSingle bond
DoubleBond Double bond
TripleBondTriple bond
WedgeBond Wedge bond
HashBond Hash bond

Covalent hydrocarbon bonds


This simulation allows us to build hydrocarbon molecules by combining carbon and hydrogen atoms.
Click here to start the simulation

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